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Jun 17, 2022
Don’t Forget the Golden Rule in Times Like These
Well, it’s official – we’re now in a bear market! Stocks, as measured by the S&P 500 Index (a proxy for large U.S. companies), have fallen by more than 20% from their all-time highs, while the Nasdaq Composite Index (almost half represented by technology companies) and the Russell 2000 Index (a proxy for small, U.S. companies) have both fallen by more than 30% from their respective highs. Even bonds, as measured by the iShares Core U.S. Aggregate Bond ETF and generally considered a safer type of investment, are down by more than 13% from their recent peaks. Right or wrong, markets have priced in a recession, very few things are working for investors, and it’s easy to understand why many people are feeling a sense of despair. It’s also the exact time when investors need to be reminded of the Golden Rule – sell high and buy low.
Jun 17, 2022
Jun 15, 2022
Our Perspective on Recent Market Activities - June 2022
Equity markets sold-off on Friday, following a disappointing Consumer Price Index (CPI) reading that showed headline inflation picked up last month, and that selloff continued through Monday. CPI was reported at 8.6% year-over-year, higher than last month’s 8.3% increase, and ahead of expectations. Core CPI, which excludes food and energy, came in slightly ahead of estimates at 6.0%, but that was down from 6.2% in April.
Jun 15, 2022
May 09, 2022
Inflation: How Did We Get Here and What Can Be Done About It
If you’re in your 50s, o.k. early 50s, you probably remember a time when a gallon of gas cost less than a dollar, when a gum ball cost a penny and when a giant shopping cart of groceries cost less than $100 – ah, the good old days. Today, gas is over $4 a gallon, a gum ball costs a quarter and your hundred dollars probably buys you half a cart of groceries, if you’re lucky. That’s inflation folks and it can become more pervasive when governments implement poor policies, when input costs rise, and when demand exceeds supply.
May 09, 2022
Apr 25, 2022
Investor Concerns and Looking Ahead
After a sizzling 2021 and a roaring 4th quarter, equity markets began 2022 on a distinct down-note. Recovery from the COVID pandemic provided blue skies for two years of solid equity gains, but storm clouds were brewing on the horizon. Increased inflation caused interest rates to drift higher during the fourth quarter of 2021, and that rise began to accelerate in the new year, precipitating a sharp decline in equities, even before any official rate hikes by the Federal Reserve. Adding to the downdraft was a slump in economic activity from a resurgent COVID virus around the world, and then the onset of war in Europe as Russia invaded Ukraine. By their mid-March lows, the S&P 500 had entered correction territory with a decline of over 10%, and the NASDAQ Composite was in a bear market with a decline of more than 20% from its high.
Apr 25, 2022
Apr 25, 2022
Investor Concerns and Looking Ahead
After a sizzling 2021 and a roaring 4th quarter, equity markets began 2022 on a distinct down-note. Recovery from the COVID pandemic provided blue skies for two years of solid equity gains, but storm clouds were brewing on the horizon.
Apr 25, 2022
Feb 03, 2022
Podcast: Generating Income in Retirement
The experts of this show featured Stephen Krauss, CFA®, Senior Vice President, Senior Wealth Advisor, and Charles Cox, CFP®, Vice President, Planning Advisor.
Feb 03, 2022
Jan 18, 2022
2021 Year in Review
The year 2021 saw a significant rebound in economic growth propelling real GDP above its pre-pandemic level. Equity markets followed along, making new highs throughout the year as corporate earnings continued their recovery. While the final numbers aren’t in yet, the expectation is that U.S. GDP grew at roughly 5.6%1 in 2021 and will likely carry that momentum into the first half of 2022 before slowing down later in the year. Not surprisingly, the primary driver of economic growth was the U.S. consumer who unleashed a wave of spending fueled by government stimulus payments, increased savings rates, and pent-up demand following 2020’s lockdowns.
Jan 18, 2022
Nov 30, 2021
Our Perspective on Recent Market Activities
Equity markets are down again today, after rebounding yesterday from Friday’s steep sell-off. Friday’s 2.5% drop took place as investors dealt with the news of another coronavirus variant labeled Omicron. The variant was originally reported in South Africa and has now been detected in other countries across the globe. This comes as some regions are still dealing with increased infection rates from the Delta variant.
Nov 30, 2021
Aug 23, 2021
Inflation: Transient or Here to Stay?
Inflation seems to be top of mind lately, garnering the attention of economists, political pundits, business owners and laymen alike – but what exactly is inflation, how is it measured, what’s considered to be normal, and how high is it now? Also, what’s been causing prices to rise, how does the Federal Reserve Bank feel about recent inflationary trends, and what’s the bond market suggesting about the short-term or long-term nature of these trends?
Aug 23, 2021
Jan 12, 2021
Bidding Adieu to 2020 and Projecting Hope for 2021

According to writingexplained.org, the phrase “bid adieu” is used formally to say goodbye or as a light-hearted and flippant way of describing cutting something out of one's life. Based on the disruption the COVID pandemic has caused for so many of us over the last year or so, it seems appropriate to bid adieu to 2020 and to look toward the prospect of a brighter 2021. As we project hope for the coming year, let’s take a moment to reflect on the economy, the market, the geopolitical landscape and our own personal health.

Jan 12, 2021
Dec 04, 2020
Light at the End of the Tunnel: Proceed with Caution
After falling to a March 23rd low of 18,592 this year, the Dow Jones Industrial Average (Dow) rallied to 29,950 on November 16th – an increase of over 61%. Some of this was due to positive results for a number of new COVID vaccine candidates, the civil passing of Election Day on November 3rd, and a 15-country Asia-Pacific trade agreement signed on November 15th. Despite the recent exuberance, however, one would be wise to maintain a cautious disposition in their investment portfolios. Fallout from a resurgence of the COVID virus, weakness in certain economic data, and structural issues related to entitlement programs like Medicare and Social Security are just a few areas to be leery of.
Dec 04, 2020
Nov 30, 2020
Podcast: Establishing Extended Relationships with Your Bank
The experts of this show featured Bethany Arnold, Vice President, Treasury Management Officer, and Greg Helmer, Vice President, Relationship Manager.
Nov 30, 2020
Sep 29, 2020
The Impact of the U.S. Presidential Election on Markets
American politics has been highly polarized for at least the past 20 years, and often the policy proposals of the two major parties have been significantly different from each other. So, it is not surprising that each side views itself as good for the economy while portraying the other as a looming disaster. With polls expected to tighten as election day draws near, many investors wonder how financial markets might respond to the various possible outcomes.
Sep 29, 2020
Aug 12, 2020
Mid-Year Outlook 2020
As 2019 grew to a close, forecasts of economic global growth were trending lower based upon several factors including geopolitical uncertainty, trade tensions and the fading impact of corporate tax cuts. Yet stock markets continued to climb as record low unemployment and low and stable interest rates buoyed investor sentiment, and most discounted the possibility of a near-term recession. However, after making new highs in early February, the rally began to sell off with the realization that dramatic steps would need to be taken to combat the virus that was no longer contained to China
Aug 12, 2020
Jun 23, 2020
The Likely Paths Out of COVID-19
Recessions, defined by economists as negative GDP growth for two consecutive quarters, are a natural component of the business cycle and on average have happened every four years since 1900. Our current situation is different in that it is not solely driven by economic forces. The global pandemic created a sense of urgency to dramatically limit our ability to interact with each other, so what we are experiencing now can be best described not as a recession but rather an economic shutdown. This distinction may be obvious, but it is important for us to understand this as we make our way out of this unprecedented predicament.
Jun 23, 2020
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